My YTT, Yoga on The Farm

Flexibility required, but not for asanas

Teaching yoga on a farm poses a unique set of challenges. Are the chickens cooped? Can’t set up there because of ants. The cat is under me in DFD, or he’s eating fresh kill (usually a bird) three feet from a student’s head during savasana. You’ve got to assess the surroundings before setting up, and let go of expectations. But I wouldn’t have it any other way.

This morning I taught my fifth class on the Farm at Rush Creek. Aside from my Bluetooth speaker not working (I thought it was charged!) it was another fantastic practice. What began as a toe dip in teaching yoga outdoors has grown into a passion. I am so grateful for my friends who have joined me to practice teaching, despite the heat, humidity, and early start time. We even practiced in the rain once, and only had to cancel class due to thunderstorms and soggy ground once.

I’m eager to continue teaching on the farm as the seasons change. We’ve got classes for September and October on the books. Contact me if you’re interested in joining us!

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My YTT, Yoga on The Farm

Starting small, planning, growing

A force that pushed me to yoga teacher training, and drives me to write about yoga, is the desire to share yoga with “non yoga people.” To clarify, yoga is for everyone! But it isn’t obvious to everyone how to find class or teacher that fits their needs and style, and booking a class in a traditional yoga studio can be intimidating. As with so many things, “fit” matters.

Within days of sharing my mission, a member of my local community offered space on their developing farm for me to teach yoga while I am in training. We have become friends, and I have been visiting the farm to get a feel for the space. There are chickens, cats, and a Labrador named Scout. There is a pond, relatively flat and clean grass, and a barn with a fridge, sink, and bathroom. It’s perfect.

Growing up in Maine, I spent my fair share of time on farms, and countless glorious hours outdoors. I treasure my connection with the land, and am thrilled to have this opportunity to teach plein air, to borrow the artist’s term.

Starting small and familiar feels right to me, because connecting to the land, to my students, matters. I am developing a five class summer series for the farm, and inviting a few friends to join me. Yoga is about practice, and I am grateful for this space and the support of my friends on this journey. Who knows where this will lead?